Colorado

KJMN (JAMN’ 92.1) – Denver – 12/5/96 – Michael Hayes

JAMN’ 92.1 was a great-sounding but short-lived Rhythmic CHR station. According to the KJMN and KQKS Wikipedia pages, JAMN’ 92.1 debuted in March 1996 and lured away all/most of the airstaff (and even at least one promotion, as heard on the aircheck) from KQKS (which at the time broadcast on 104.3 under the name “KS104”). In November of that year, Western Cities (owner of KQKS) sold the station to Jefferson-Pilot, which also owned Mainstream CHR KHHT “K-Hits 107.5” — a station with a much more powerful signal than 104.3 (and 92.1).  In February 1997, KQKS and its Rhythmic CHR format moved to 107.5 under the name “KS107.5”.  An aircheck of KS107.5, recorded not long after its debut, is also available on this site. One month later, JAMN&#...

KHHT (K-Hits 107.5) – Denver – 12/3/96 – George McFly

This is a montage of “Denver’s 90’s Hit Music Station”, recorded 19 years ago yesterday. K-Hits 107.5 replaced KWMX “Mix 107.5” in early August 1996, only to be shelved in favor of KQKS “KS-107.5” by the second week of January 1997. More details about the history of this short-lived station can be found at The Format Change Archive and this Billboard magazine article accessible via Google Books.  

KQKS (KS107-5) – Denver – 2/3/97 – George McFly

Recorded 18 years ago today, this is a sample of “The New KS107-5, The Sweet Beat of Denver” shortly after its move (and signal upgrade) from 104.3 (KS104). To promote the change, the station was running a “cash cow” contest in which listeners were asked to call in upon hearing the sound of a cow (featured on the aircheck), and say “I made the moooooove to KS107-5” if they were the correct caller. KQKS claimed that it was “the biggest cash giveaway in the history of Denver radio.” This is one of my favorite airchecks, primarily for the station’s outstanding engineering (great processing) and production elements (voiceovers, sweepers, and jingles). Their approach to Rhythmic CHR was upbeat, without sounding “ghetto”. It inclu...

KQKS (KS107.5) – Denver – 2/3/97

This is a sample of “The static-free beat of Denver” shortly after its move (and signal upgrade) from 104.3 (KS104), recorded 17 years ago this week. To promote the change, the station was running a “cash cow” contest in which listeners were asked to call in upon hearing the sound of a cow (featured on the aircheck), and say “I made the moooooove to KS107-5″ if they were the correct caller. This is one of my favorite airchecks, primarily for the station’s outstanding engineering (great processing) and production elements (voiceovers, sweepers, and jingles). Their approach to Rhythmic CHR was upbeat, without sounding “ghetto”. Be sure to check out the other KQKS aircheck posted on our site as well.    

Small Western U.S. Market Bandscan – January 1998 – Various Personalities

This montage includes brief snippets of the following stations: KMXY “Mix 104.3” Grand Junction, CO KWYK-FM Farmington, NM KBOS “B95” Fresno, CA KDON “102.5 K-DON” Monterey, CA KTMT “Beat 93” Medford, OR

KXPK (96.5 the Peak) – Denver – December 1996 – Jackie Selby

Recorded 17 years ago this month, here’s a sample of Denver’s KXPK during its days as a AAA-formatted station. According to Wikipedia, 96.5 the Peak attempted to compete with KBCO during this time. Between 1998 and 2002, the station attempted two other formats while maintaining the “Peak” name. Following a sale to Entravision in 2002, KXPK flipped to a Spanish-language format, which it still has today.

Beat Radio (on KIDR-AM 740 Phoenix) – 1998

During the mid-90′s, KIDR (740 AM) in Phoenix was one of several radio stations across the U.S. affiliated with the childrens’-targetted “Radio AAHS” network. Ten of these stations were owned by Radio AAHS. By January 1998, with Radio Disney having launched its own competing network, Radio AAHS ceased operations. They put the ten stations up for sale (KIDR had joined this group not long before the sale was announced). Until a buyer was found, the affiliates (both the AAHS-owned and non-owned stations) aired a mix of random music and paid programming for 12 hours (4am-4pm PT), and all-dance “Beat Radio” for the remaining 12 hours (4pm-4am PT). This is a sample of Beat Radio, recorded at some point during its 8-month run from February to October of that year. Much more detailed information c...

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