1995

WBBM-FM (B96) – Chicago – 12/31/95 – George McFly & Frankie Hollywood Rodriguez (Top 96 of ’95)

During a significant portion of the 1990′s, B96 offered a dance music-heavy format focused on currents — making it one of the very few major market, full signal commercial stations in the U.S. to find success with that formula during that decade. This aircheck, recorded at the peak of that era (and 18 years ago tonight), is a great example of why dance radio fanatics held the station in such high regard. You’ll hear the end of the “Top 96 of 1995” year-end countdown, followed by an outstanding montage counting down the final 3 minutes of 1995, leading into 1996. The hosts are longtime station personalities George McFly and Frankie “Hollywood” Rodriguez. And at the end of this aircheck  are snippets of programming that aired prior to the aforementioned countdow...

KKFR (Power 92) – Phoenix – 5/5/95 – Carey Edwards

Recorded on Cinco de Mayo 1995 – this is a sample of the only CHR serving the Valley of the Sun in the early to mid-90’s. In late 1993, despite enjoying great success as a Rhythmic CHR, Power 92 flipped to Modern Rock-heavy Mainstream CHR.  Ratings declined, and the station began to move back towards Rhythmic CHR by the Fall of 1994.  When this aircheck was recorded, the station used a Dance-heavy approach; the sound evolved to one more based on R&B (but remained Dance-friendly) by the Fall of 1995, which led to the station achieving an all-time high 7.0 Arbitron share (12+). Featuring entertaining sweepers voiced by Marc Driscoll, Power 92 was just a fun station to listen in this era.  Especially now, I appreciate that they always had live legal IDs at this time.  Also, I&...

KKFR (Power 92) – Phoenix – Nov 22/23, 1995 – Roxanne Steele

“Today’s Hottest Music is on Power 92”.  This aircheck, recorded on the night before Thanksgiving 1995, represents the sound of KKFR (92.3) Glendale/Phoenix that led the station to an all-time high 7.0 Arbitron share (12+).  At this time, Power 92 offered superb all-around music, air talent, and production values.  Hosted by Roxanne Steele (who later spent over a decade at Chicago’s B96).

KKSS (Hot Jammin’ 97.3 Kiss-FM) – Albuquerque – 7/18/95 – Chico Banana

This is a sample of Albuquerque’s heritage Rhythmic CHR from the mid-90’s, when it offered a relatively balanced Rhythmic CHR format and a high-energy presentation. The station has survived many competitors over the years.  (The logo shown above is not from the era when this aircheck was recorded.) Please note: at some point (perhaps the original recording), the pitch of the audio on this aircheck became too high (hope that’s the right term?) – everything sounds “faster” than it should be. Note the similarities between this station and Chattanooga’s WKXJ “Hot Jammin’ Kicks FM” from 1998. Besides their nearly identical names, both were/are on 97.3 FM and employed the phrase “one half hour total music jam”. There had to ...

KKFR (Power 92) – Phoenix – 4/28/95 – Bruce & Maggie

This aircheck of KKFR, during its peak in the mid-1990’s, features morning show hosts Bruce Kelly & Maggie Brock broadcasting live from Majerle’s sports bar in downtown Phoenix, giving away tickets to games in the the Portland Trailblazers/Phoenix Suns first-round NBA playoff series.

WNNX (99X) – Atlanta – March & September ’95 – Yvonne Monet

For a good portion of its history, the radio format “Alternative” has been synonymous with “Modern Rock”. However, there was a time when the format encompassed other styles of music that were also considered an “alternative” to the mainstream – as demonstrated on this aircheck. It’s a brief montage of the hosting and production elements surrounding “The Beat Factory”, a progressive dance music show heard Saturday nights on the original incarnation of 99X in Atlanta.  

KITS (Live 105) – San Francisco – 6/24/95 – Rolin West

Recorded 21 years ago today, this is a brief sample of The Bay Area’s longtime Alternative/Modern Rocker. Visit the KITS page on Wikipedia for more information on the history of this station.

KXYL 1240 (Kiss-AM) – Brownwood, TX – 4/2/95 (CHR on AM!)

Deviating from the name and predominant theme of our site, and recorded a little over 20 years ago this month, here’s a sample of what had become a rarity by the mid-90’s: a (Mainstream) CHR station heard on AM, without an FM simulcast partner.

WBBM-FM (B96) – Chicago – 12/23/96 – Blue Mike, Bobby D, Julian ‘Jumpin’ Perez

During a significant portion of the 1990’s, B96 offered a dance music-heavy format focused on currents — making it one of the very few major market, full signal commercial stations in the U.S. to find success with that formula during that decade. This aircheck, recorded at the peak of that era (two nights before Christmas 1996), is a great example of why dance radio fanatics held the station in such high regard. It begins with a montage of the “10 O’Clock Remix”, featuring different genres of dance courtesy of longtime B96 mixers Bobby D and Julian’ Jumpin Perez. The mixers are followed by regular programming, hosted by Blue Mike a.k.a. Michael Horn. More information about Horn’s lengthy tenure with B96 can be found at THIS page.

WMGI (100.7 Mix-FM) – Terre Haute, IN – 7/16/95 – Bryan Thomas

During the mid-90’s, 100.7 Mix-FM was a unique small market CHR, offering a surprisingly dance-music-friendly format. This aircheck was recorded 18 years ago today.

KLRZ (Pirate Radio Z100) – Larose, LA – 1/7/95

During the early to mid-90’s, many Top 40 stations in the United States leaned towards either Rhythmic music or towards Modern Rock. This is a sample of a station with the latter approach – recorded 19 years ago yesterday. According to Wikipedia, KLRZ actually targetted the New Orleans market during this time, with a goal of moving the transmitter closer to that area. However, Hurricane Katrina effectively ended those plans.  

WILN (Island 106) – Panama City, FL – 5/14/95 – Sean Phillips

Island 106 is one of the longest-running Top 40 stations in the United States. This sample of the station is from the mid-90’s (recorded 18 years ago this month), when it offered a Rhythmic-leaning Mainstream CHR approach – not unlike Phoenix’s KKFR “Power 92” at the time.    

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