Party Radio

KPTY (Party Radio @ 103.9) – Phoenix – 12/30/99 – Dead Air Dave

In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, 103.9 FM — which targeted the Phoenix area from rural/suburban signals –  held a number of different formats. It began in the Spring of 1996 with a six-month Rhythmic Oldies stunt format named “S-T-E-V-E”. On October 30th of that year, it officially signed on as “The New 103.9, Arizona’s Party Station”, with a hip-hop-oriented Rhythmic CHR format and enjoyed impressive ratings (especially considering the signal limitations).  Its target, the more dance/pop/R&B-oriented KKFR “Power 92”, took notice and transformed itself into a pure hip-hop/R&B station within 9 months. A year later, 103.9 FM (whose calls had become KPTY) went in a completely different direction, offering a mix of alternative/modern rock and hip-hop in a format unofficially known ...

WBBM-FM (B96) – Chicago – 12/23/96 – Blue Mike, Bobby D, Julian ‘Jumpin’ Perez

During a significant portion of the 1990’s, B96 offered a dance music-heavy format focused on currents — making it one of the very few major market, full signal commercial stations in the U.S. to find success with that formula during that decade. This aircheck, recorded at the peak of that era (two nights before Christmas 1996), is a great example of why dance radio fanatics held the station in such high regard. It begins with a montage of the “10 O’Clock Remix”, featuring different genres of dance courtesy of longtime B96 mixers Bobby D and Julian’ Jumpin Perez. The mixers are followed by regular programming, hosted by Blue Mike a.k.a. Michael Horn. More information about Horn’s lengthy tenure with B96 can be found at THIS page.

KPTY (Party Radio @ 103.9) – Phoenix – 1998/1999 – Various Personalities

In the late 1990′s and early 2000′s, 103.9 FM — which targeted the Phoenix area from rural/suburban signals –  held a number of different formats. It began in the Spring of 1996 with a six-month Rhythmic Oldies stunt format named “S-T-E-V-E”. On October 30th of that year, it officially signed on as “The New 103.9, Arizona’s Party Station”, with a hip-hop-oriented Rhythmic CHR format and enjoyed impressive ratings (especially considering the signal limitations).  Its target, the more dance/pop/R&B-oriented KKFR “Power 92″, took notice and transformed itself into a pure hip-hop/R&B station within 9 months. A year later, 103.9 FM (whose calls had become KPTY) went in a completely different direction, offering a mix of alternative/modern rock and hip-hop in a format unofficially ...

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