1996

KHTS (Channel 933) – San Diego – October 1996

“The New Beat of San Diego” – this aircheck, from October 1996, represents the sound of Channel 9-3-3 in its earliest days. It offered an outstanding music mix, talent, sweepers, and all-around production values. IMHO, this is what a Dance CHR station should sound like, and it’s the best I’ve personally ever heard. However, the masses did not agree  – KHTS evolved to a more conventional Rhythmic CHR in early 1997.  

KISF (107.3) – Kansas City – 7/3/96 – Jason Justice

Per Wikipedia, 107.3 FM in Kansas City began evolving from Top 40 to Modern Rock in late 1994, yet chose to kept the “Kiss” name (albeit shifting from “Kiss 107.3” to “107.3 Kiss-FM”). The imaging and presentation was also reminiscent of its previous format.  The station had adopted a more common modern rock approach by the summer of 1995. And by a year later, when this aircheck was recorded, the moniker was simply “107.3”.  

XETRA-FM (91X) – Tijuana/San Diego – 7/15/96 – B.C.

Broadcasting from Tijuana, Baja California and serving the San Diego, California market, 91X has been one of the longest running Alternative/Modern Rock stations heard in the United States. This is a sample of the station from the mid 90’s, around the time when – per Wikipedia – the marketing and operating rights were acquired by Jacor Communications (later Clear Channel Communications). 91X is currently operated by Local Media San Diego, LLC.  

WLUW (Energy 88.7) – Chicago – 11/22/96 – Jammin’Down JD & DJ Revel

“Club Jam” was a Friday night 8-hour dance music program that made its debut on Loyola University’s WLUW (Energy 88.7) in 1993. Please visit the archived JamTraxx Media Website for more information about the history of this program.  

KBZR (The New 103.9) – Coolidge/Phoenix, AZ – 10/30/96 – Krazy Kid Stevens (DEBUT/FIRST DAY)

On October 30, 1996, at 3:30pm, following more than six months of stunting, KBZR officially launched as “The New 103.9, Arizona’s Party Station”. Shown here are the following: (1) YouTube video: A news story about the debut that aired on the 10pm newscast of local Phoenix TV station KTVK (Channel 3). (2) Aircheck (below the video): the actual sign-on along with a mix show that immediately followed. Please visit Formatchange.com for more details about the history of the station.

WLKT (104.5 the Cat) – Lexington, KY – 6/8 & 6/10/96 – Shane Collins

“We’re in the tune in your head…Lexington’s new 104.5 the Kat.” In the early to mid 90’s, as the CHR format disappeared across the U.S., the idea of a single station offering multiple genres of music had become foreign in many areas. This is presumably why WLKT heavily employed the slogan “Music for All People” on this aircheck (which I believe was recorded not long after the sign-on) — and you will hear, they did a great job of living up to that promise. Note that this aircheck consists of several segments recorded on two separate days (not a single continous recording), so certain songs are heard twice.

KBZR (103.9 FM) – Coolidge/Phoenix, AZ – 9/30/96 (S.T.E.V.E stunt)

For six months in 1996, KBZR (103.9 FM)/Coolidge, AZ offered one of the most creative stunts in radio history.  In between an automated Rhythmic Oldies format was a series of clever interstitials (voiced by station owner Jerry Clifton) indicating that the station was “moving in from the desert” (referring to a pending signal upgrade to allow for better coverage in the metro Phoenix area) and looking for someone — or something — named “Steve”. This aircheck was recorded exactly one month before the stunt ended.  By this point, the station had begun simulcasting on additional frequencies through Central and North-Central Arizona (presumably to compensate for the extended delays in upgrading the 103.9 signal), and it was revealed that “Steve” wa...

WWLD 106.1 (Wild 106) – Tallahassee, FL – 1996

This is a sample of 106.1 FM in Tallahassee during its run as a Rhythmic-leaning Mainstream CHR. The exact date of the aircheck is unknown, but per comments made by the air personality, it was apparently recorded on a weekday holiday. The WWLD call letters were in place from 3/29/96 to 10/15/96. At that point, they became WUTL. However, it is unclear whether a format change took place at the same time. The station definitely flipped to Rhythmic Oldies in March 1999.

WIOQ (Q102) – Philadelphia – June 1996 – Chio (Part 2 of 2)

This is a sample of WIOQ during its Dance-leaning CHR days in the mid to late 90’s.  The station was a favorite among U.S. dance radio enthusiasts (such as yours truly) at this time. NOTE: The first half of this aircheck can be found HERE.  

WIOQ (Q102) – Philadelphia – June 1996 – Chio (Part 1 of 2)

This is a sample of WIOQ during its Dance-leaning CHR days in the mid to late 90’s.  The station was a favorite among U.S. dance radio enthusiasts (such as yours truly) at this time. NOTE: The second half of this aircheck can be found HERE.

KBZR (103.9 FM) – Coolidge/Phoenix, AZ – 5/11/96 (S.T.E.V.E. stunt)

For six months in 1996, KBZR (103.9 FM)/Coolidge, AZ offered one of the most creative stunts in radio history.  In between an automated Rhythmic Oldies format was a series of clever interstitials (voiced by station owner Jerry Clifton) indicating that the station was “moving in from the desert” (referring to a pending signal upgrade to allow for better coverage in the metro Phoenix area) and looking for someone — or something — named “Steve”. This aircheck was recorded in the early days of the stunt (probably about six weeks in) — KBZR was referring to itself as “The Space Station” at this time. Included is a commercial for the infamous “J.J., The King of Beepers”, whose advertising was heard throughout multiple Southwestern markets at ...

KPWR (Power 106) – Los Angeles – 1985-1995 (various)

On the heels of today’s stunning announcement regarding the sale of KPWR from Emmis to Mereulo Group, we felt it would be appropriate to re-feature an aircheck of this legendary radio station. =============== In early 1986, Emmis Broadcasting flipped 105.9 FM in Los Angeles from KMGG “Magic 106″ (apparently some form of Hot AC) to Rhythmic CHR (then a relatively new format) as “Power 106″.  The station became an instant hit, surpassing heritage Mainstream KIIS  in all dayparts except Morning Drive, where Rick Dees continued to dominnate. The beginning of this aircheck contains various snippets of KPWR from what appears to be approximately 1989. It is then followed by a special mix featured on the station in 1995, titled “Blowin’ Up 10 Years of Flava.” However, as st...

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