October

WRQX (Q107) – Washington, D.C. – 10/1/88 – Uncle Johnny Walker

107.3 FM in Washington, D.C. has been Hot AC as “Mix 107.3” since 1990. But in the 12 years prior, it was CHR/Top 40 as “Q107”. This sample from October 1988 – recorded during the station’s “Top 10 at 10” countdown – demonstrates the dominance of hairband acts on the pop charts at the time. Thanks to Robyn Watts for contributing this aircheck. Our sister site, Airchexx.com, also features a pair of Q107 samples: Uncle Johnny, 12/26/83 Celeste Clark, 12/26/85

WHHH (Hoosier 96) – Indianapolis – 10/29/91 – RJ Miles

After having been granted the call letters WHHH a couple of months earlier, 96.3 FM in Indianapolis hit the air on October 28, 1991 — making it the first new FM signal in the market in over 25 years. This aircheck was seemingly recorded overnight following the station’s first full day.  A video of the actual sign-on is posted on Youtube (the logo shown above is a screen shot taken from that video.) In these earliest moments, the station referred to itself multiple ways: “Hoosier 96” “Hoosier Hot 96” “Hot Hoosier 96” “Hot Hoosier 96.3” “Hoosier Hot 96 Dot 3” “Hoosier 96, WHHH” “Hoosier 96 Dot 3, WHHH” “96 Dot 3, WHHH” Today, the station calls itself “Hot 96.3” and offers a...

WEGX (Eagle 106) – Philadelphia – October 1991 – Bobby Willis

“Today’s best music mix…the new sound of Eagle 106”.  This is a great example of pure Mainstream CHR for its era, recorded just before Halloween 1991.

WHFS 99.1 – Washington, D.C. – 10/24/98

The WHFS call letters/branding have been found on a variety of frequencies, particularly over the past 10 years or so. Please visit this Wikipedia page for more information on the history of this station.

KBOS (B95) – Fresno, CA – 10/13/90 – Jack Armstrong

This is a sample of Fresno’s heritage CHR from the start of the 1990’s. Quoting from comments made by FMairchecks.com contributor Robyn Watts on another B95 aircheck posted here: According to online records as well as back issues of “Billboard”, [KBOS] was on the air by the late 60s-early 70s with a Beautiful/Easy Listening format. Sometime in the mid to late 70s, the station switched to AOR, adopting the name “The Boss” in the process. In 1983, the station switched to mainstream Top 40 adopting the “B-95″ name. It went Rhythmic around 1987 after KPWR/LA had proven the success of the format. One interesting note: Jack Armstrong (yes, THAT Jack Armstrong!!!) did mornings at B-95 in the mid to late 80s before leaving California to go back to North Carolina. This aircheck was reco...

WXYV (102.7 ‘XYV) – Baltimore – 10/17/97 – Greg Valentine

This is a sample of Baltimore’s uptempo “102.7 ‘XYV” about four months after its debut.

KZZP (104-7 ZZP) – Phoenix – 10/29/00 – Bonzai Brian

During the 80’s, KZZP 104.7 FM in Phoenix was one of the most successful Mainstream CHR stations in the country. According to the station’s Wikipedia page, it “produced a long list of future stars in the radio business”, and offered a music mix that was adventurous for a Top 40 station. However, a combination of changes in personalities, management, and overall pop music tastes led to the station’s downfall (in April 1991). Five years later, owner Nationwide Communications brought KZZP back to the airwaves with a Modern AC format, making an attempt to appeal to the listeners who grew up with the station as a CHR. The station performed well, ranking #1 in key demos by 1998. However, by that point, Jacor (now Clear Channel) had taken ownership of KZZP along with KGLQ (96.9). On Labor Day Wee...

KKND (106.7 the End) – New Orleans – Oct ’96 – Rod Ryan

This is a sample of New Orleans’ modern rocker of nearly a decade shortly after its debut. Per Wikipedia, the station was knocked off the air by Hurricane Katrina in late August 2005. When it resumed broadcasting in January of the following year, the format had changed.

WAPW (Power 99) – Atlanta – Oct ’91 – Telephone Tony

This is a sample of Atlanta’s Power 99 — which, according to Wikipedia, was the “dominant top-40 station in the Southeast” at the start of the 90′s — about a year before it flipped to Modern Rock as 99x. The personality is Telephone Tony — later known as Tone E. Fly. Before Power 99, Telephone Tony was Kid Kelly’s producer/sidekick at Z100/NY and now hosts mornings at KTWN “96.3 K-Twin” in Minneapolis-St. Paul (under the name Tony Fly, according to ktwin.com)  Perhaps somewhat ironically, this aircheck was recorded during one of the games of the 1991 World Series between the Atlanta Braves and Minnesota Twins. Telephone Tony was apparently filling in for personalities Domino and Crash, who were suspended for an incident related to the World Series. Many thanks to Benji Kurtz (via Robyn Wat...

WPOW (Power 96) – Miami – 10/2/98

“THE most listened to radio station in the Southeast U.S.A….” Miami’s Power 96 is one of America’s heritage Rhythmic CHRs.  It has always offered an approach custom-tailored to its unique market – a rarity in an increasingly homogenized and corporate-dominated radio environment. This aircheck includes a sample of a “Freestyle Friday” mix.

WBSS (Boss 97 FM) – Atlantic City, NJ – 10/16/94

At a time when many CHRs leaned towards R&B/Hip-Hop or Modern Rock, Boss 97 FM offered a Dance-oriented approach – making it seemingly one of the very few stations in the U.S. to do so (offhand, the only others I can think of were WBBM-FM/B96 Chicago and I assume KNHC/C89 Seattle – am I forgetting any?) This aircheck includes an amusing segment titled “Crow For Your Team”, focused on the NFL game taking place that weekend between two longtime rivals: The Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys.  Two listeners called in and had 15 seconds to explain why their team would emerge victorious.  The Cowboys fan was acknowledged as dialing from a  noisy “car phone”, and a “Judge Lance Ito” (from OJ Simpson trial fame) picked the winner. This was n...

WSNI 104.5 – Philadelphia – Oct ’86 – Chris Guetta, Paul Michael Tyler

Recorded 29 years ago this month, this is a sample of 104.5 FM in Philadelphia during its first incarnation as Adult Contemporary-formatted WSNI. Quoting from Wikipedia: “On January 1, 1980, WSNI became known as “Sunny 104” at first, then later “Sunny 104 1/2,” and eventually “Sunny 104.5,” a name which was reused later on in the station’s history. “Sunny” dumped easy listening in favor of an Adult Contemporary format playing the Top 40 hits of the 1960s, Top 40/Adult contemporary crossovers of the 1970s, and the Adult Contemporary hits of the 1980s up to and including then-current product.” NOTE: On this aircheck, the station refers to itself as “104.5 WSNI” more often than “Sunny” or “Sunny 10...

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